Lower Manhattan Comes Back Swinging

It’s been sixteen years since the terrorist attacks of September 11th irrevocably changed the landscape of Lower Manhattan. The tragedy resulted in an estimated 10 billion dollars in property damage. Since then the city has rebuilt itself. The comeback includes reconstructed buildings and storefronts including the freedom tower and the WTC Oculus Mall. The area has also reemerged as a popular residential sector. Some 60,000 people now call Lower Manhattan home, a 300% increase from pre-attack numbers.
Ralph recently caught up with famed boxing trainer Martin Snow, proprietor of Lower Manhattan’s Trinity Boxing Club. Snow, a NYC legend has owned and operated Trinity for over two decades. He has managed to sustain and grow his business despite the devastating effects of September 11th and Hurricane Sandy.
For Martin, diversity and balance distinguish Lower Manhattan from its neighbors. “There’s a good blend between business and residence. There’s such great energy in the parks. It’s like something is happening all the time.”

According to Snow, the combination of different cultures and backgrounds  is akin to the art of “making stew.” To bring those so called flavors together, Snow can routinely be found outside his club, tossing a football to neighbors and newcomers alike.

Martin Snow lives by the Trinity Boxing club motto, “ Fight the good Fight.” That mantra easily applies to the resilient spirit of Lower Manhattan. This revived neighborhood has come back swinging, with property prices rising at twice the rate of the rear of Manhattan. What was once a commercial and business sector has been reborn as a 24 hour neighborhood, flush with the energy that have come to define Martin Snow and other residents of Manhattan’s hardest hit and hardest fighting sector. For more information about this and other neighborhoods please contact us or comment below.

Lower Manhattan Comes Back Swinging

It’s been sixteen years since the terrorist attacks of September 11th irrevocably changed the landscape of Lower Manhattan. The tragedy resulted in an estimated 10 billion dollars in property damage. Since then the city has rebuilt itself. The comeback includes reconstructed buildings and storefronts including the freedom tower and the WTC Oculus Mall. The area has also reemerged as a popular residential sector. Some 60,000 people now call Lower Manhattan home, a 300% increase from pre-attack numbers.
Ralph recently caught up with famed boxing trainer Martin Snow, proprietor of Lower Manhattan’s Trinity Boxing Club. Snow, a NYC legend has owned and operated Trinity for over two decades. He has managed to sustain and grow his business despite the devastating effects of September 11th and Hurricane Sandy.
For Martin, diversity and balance distinguish Lower Manhattan from its neighbors. “There’s a good blend between business and residence. There’s such great energy in the parks. It’s like something is happening all the time.”

According to Snow, the combination of different cultures and backgrounds  is akin to the art of “making stew.” To bring those so called flavors together, Snow can routinely be found outside his club, tossing a football to neighbors and newcomers alike.

Martin Snow lives by the Trinity Boxing club motto, “ Fight the good Fight.” That mantra easily applies to the resilient spirit of Lower Manhattan. This revived neighborhood has come back swinging, with property prices rising at twice the rate of the rear of Manhattan. What was once a commercial and business sector has been reborn as a 24 hour neighborhood, flush with the energy that have come to define Martin Snow and other residents of Manhattan’s hardest hit and hardest fighting sector. For more information about this and other neighborhoods please contact us or comment below.